Plush

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Plush on Steam

MSRP: $3.99

Platforms: Win, Mac, Linux

Release: 2/13/15


After goofing around in Plush, my first instinct was to call it yet another great concept with not quite successful execution, but I quickly realized that the execution is less of an issue than my expectation.  See, I was expecting a puzzle game where items just kind of settle into place in an orderly fashion; after all, what’s a better illustration of happiness than tidiness? At least, that’s what we’re supposed to believe.

Instead, Plush is more of a physics puzzler, where you need to drag the stuffed animals around the bed, limbs flopping about, and maybe the only way to make them happy is to drop them on their cute little faces and then carelessly toss another toy into their happiness radiance.  Yes, clearly the chaos bugs me just a little bit. I’m working through it.

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There are three difficulty levels, and in all but the easiest, a stuffed animal hitting the floor (like that bear over by the nightstand on the right) forces a level restart. There’s a reason that carpet is red – the floor is lava. Just don’t drop anything, ok? Each different type of stuffed animal has different needs – bears want to cuddle, while unicorns want to be left alone (unless there are ponies. Unicorns love ponies). To complete a level, all you have to do is make sure every stuffed animal has a green circle around it.  The pillows are stationary and unpassable; you will need to maneuver around them.

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The real charm of the game comes in the soothing voice of the narrator, who only sounds like he’s judging you a little bit when you close the level description before he’s done reading. Then there are the child’s voice, talking to her stuffed toys. It’s just syrupy kinds of cute, and it works.

Considering three difficulty options and 40 levels, it’s not a bad value, even before you consider the free play mode, where you can just toss stuffed animals around willy nilly as much as your computer can take.  My biggest critique is that this feels like a game that should be ported to mobile, because I think moving the animals could be immensely satisfying with a touch screen.

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